Friendships in Seasons {POTF}

15 This you know, that all who are in Asia turned away from me; of whom are Phygelus and Hermogenes. 16 May the Lord grant mercy to the house of Onesiphorus, for he often refreshed me, and was not ashamed of my chain, 17 but when he was in Rome, he sought me diligently, and found me 18 (the Lord grant to him to find the Lord’s mercy in that day); and in how many things he served at Ephesus, you know very well (1 Timothy 1:15-18, WEB).

This is a place in Scripture, which can comfort many of us. We all go through times, where friends can opt to leave us. And, it is a hard thing to experience. . . but this Scripture offers hope. The hope is found through our Lord Jesus Christ! He is our Provider.

While friendships do change over time, let’s choose to realize the Lord is able to give us people to “do life” alongside.

You might be going through a “friendship drought” right now. Hang in there, dear reader. Keep relying on the Lord and praying for Him to bring you friends who are choosing to follow Him – who can help you along your way. Dive deep into your friendship with the Lord Himself, and stay connected to your Church family – even when the relationships don’t seem to be there or anywhere. He is working.

How does this passage teach us about friendships?

1… Remember those who have chosen to stay, when everyone else has moved on.

2… Not only do we need to remember these friends, we need to pray for our friends.

3… Choose to be a friend who stays with others in the valleys of life. Choose to be a friend who stays and is there to help refresh others in the midst of their trials.

When facing our own trials, it can be difficult to be there for another who is going through their own storm. It is possible, but requires due diligence. The best way to “be there” is use technology to check on friends, ask how we can specifically pray for them, or send them an uplifting song we come across.

4… Take some time and search your own heart. How have you wrestled with feeling ashamed of someone or their trial? Paul was blessed with a friend who intimately knew our Lord Jesus – and wasn’t ashamed of his friend’s circumstances. Being unashamed helped Paul’s friend to be emotionally available.

5… Put effort into pursuing friendships. I am not talking about taking ourselves on a mission trip to contact everyone we have ever met. I am talking about practical ways to dive in a bit more to cultivate deeper friendships. This means choosing to focus on one or two friends, praying for them, and learning how to be more selfless (focused on them, versus dominating the conversation) – so we can be there for them.

Each of these things are designed to help our relationships. But something must happen first. We need to make our friendship with our Lord Jesus our top priority. Allow Him to refresh you, so He can give you all that is needed to be there for others.

In Him,



That One Compliment {Inspiring Women}

Hi friends! For the months of May/June, we will be using a reading plan given to us by Sweet to the Soul Ministries. Feel free to stroll through their Facebook page and blog. They even have a journaling kit and Bible study for this month’s plan.

In high school, a teacher called me something that I have never forgotten. It was one of the greatest compliments I could ever receive in my life back then. I was awkward, detail obseessed, and a passionate worker when solo. Yet, all that stood out was one word – conscientious.

The mind of the prudent is ever getting knowledge, and the ear of the wise is ever seeking (inquiring for and craving) knowledge (Proverbs 18:15, AMPC).

Conscientious. It continues to be something I think on, and encourages me in my endeavors. I want to work well. While I can work well with giving less, I want to become a woman of God who strives to give Him her best.

As women seeking to inspire, let’s become prudent women who love Jesus and continue to pursue Him.

As women who understand what is right, we need to make knowledge of God and His Word our highest priority. For the conscientious woman, she will want to not only gain the knowledge but seek to apply it to her life as well.

Nearly three years ago, we learned the value of prudence. For the God fearing, we need be careful, not careless, in order to avoid pitfalls.  Our relationship with God through Jesus Christ is worthy of all required efforts to live a lifestyle – where our decisions are significant; we know and do “what would glorify God,” and have a lifestyle where “God would be honored.”

Those who do what is right, will seek to better themselves. They will look to the Proverbs and other books of the Bible to learn and grow in their relationship with our risen Lord.

While each had their failures as they were human, Abigail and David were seen as a couple who both displayed prudence before they got together.

  • Abigail was a prudent woman who was quick to soften the conflict, possible disaster against her imprudent husband.
  • David was seen as prudent in words long before his reign as king. It was right up there, with his musical capabilities.

Friends, let’s become prudent people. This characteristic will affect not only our own lives, but the lives of others around us. It can become tempting to consider and overwhelm ourselves with all the changes we need to make, but let us focus solely on the most important change we need to make – which is to have a heart desire to listen to and act upon God’s instructions for our lives.

We need a heart’s desire for Jesus, friends.

It has been several years ago since I received my conscientious compliment, but I hold it dear to this very day.

I want to be known as the girl who loves Jesus and gives Him her best. That is a legacy worth having!

Image by Lauren Mancke.

In Christ,


Commitments: How to Honor God

Lately, something on my mind is “commitments”. I want to be a person who does and says, well what she says she will do. Chronic illness can make this quite difficult.

  • “Ohhh, I’m too sick to read _____________ today”.
  • “Ohhhh, I’m going to have to push past this (the x, y, and z of my symptoms for that particular day), and get _______________ done”.

There are a ton of those examples, and I am not the only one who has them. When battling chronic illness, commitments are hard to make. How we follow through will impact others’ view of us. I am not so much worried about how others perceived me, not like I used to be. In terms of commitments, it has to be giving God my best.

Sick or not, we all have commitments. Despite how we feel, those commitments and whether or not we are able to fulfill them weighs on our hearts.

One thing that has been really important to me can be summed up in one word: diligence. Am I diligent in the commitments that I do make? Bottom line: I want to be someone who gives God her best. I don’t want to set out and give people my best, though by setting my focus on God- that happens.

God is the only one I want to fix my eyes on. God knows my heart, my actions, my commitments, my words, my body. He knows when I have pushed to far, and when I just need to rest. With God, He knows it all. So, I don’t need to worry about being seen as lazy, etc. God knows my all. When I pray about it, choose to commitment to something, I chose to give God my all by giving Him my best. I have the chance to impact the Kingdom of God, by fulfilling my commitments. I don’t have to worry about guilt setting in, because God knows my motives, my limitations, and everything else.

When we make commitments, do we let honoring God be our motives? How do we handle it when our limitations outweigh our ability to fulfill our commitments?